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Monday, December 26, 2016

Post Christmas Wishes

~ ~ by Vonnie Davis

I'm writing this on Christmas Day. Our house is quiet except for carols playing on the kitchen radio and Calvin singing as he rides his stationary bike. I can't quite make out the tune, but it sounds like a Beetle's song. We'd decided on a low-key Christmas this year due to Calvin's recent heart attack. Just as well since an intestinal virus hit me yesterday morning. I think it brought a three-piece set of luggage, intent on staying for awhile.

My daughter lives in northern Indiana. My two sons in northern Maryland. Calvin's son and only child lives in Berlin just a few blocks from the terrorist attack this week. We're in southern Virginia. No traveling since I have a deadline looming.

Calvin asked me the other day how much longer he'd only be seeing the top of my head, his gentle way of saying he feels ignored. Time for a husband break and, as I look around, some deep house cleaning wouldn't be a bad thing either. And again, I ask myself how did I get so busy in retirement? Oh, right, I decided to write a book. I'm working on number 21 now.

I have a great-grandson, Benjamin, in Indiana. Here's a Christmas Eve photo of him wearing his Santa suit his crazy great-grandma sent. His Aunt Eleni, our June bride this year, is holding him. Couldn't you just kiss the sweetness off his chubby cheeks?


Family, whether near or far, is so important. In this crazy world, their safety is more valuable than ever. Calvin and I were at Bob Evans restaurant when I got an email from Kelly, Calvin's son. "Tell Dad I'm okay. So is Katrin. We can see the smoke and hear the ambulances from our penthouse balcony. I don't want him to worry. We were home when the terrorist attack occurred. We're safe."

What?

Calvin was on his iPad, reading various news stories. He hadn't mentioned anything happening in Germany. So I turned my laptop around and told him to read Kelly's email. His fingers started flying over his iPad keys until he found the story. We packed up and headed for home to watch the news. Calvin called Kelly just to hear his voice. Parents are like that. We just have to have tangible proof. For him on the other side of the world, Kelly's soft voice calmed him. Kelly is a senior programmer and developer for Mozilla.



We live in a world that seems more and more hate-filled. Maybe it's always been this way and we were blissfully ignorant without the continuous news channels barking at us. I don't know. But for you all, I wish you family to love and take pride in, good health, and safety for yourself and your loved ones. Hugs.

8 comments:

  1. I keep wanting to think it's not more hate-filled but it seems like it is. It certainly is more rage-filled with people shooting or stabbing each other over some little thing that they would have ignored at one time. Your quiet Christmas and love of family seems an apropos way to fight against that at least in one little corner of the world. If we each did that...

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    1. I'm a hugger, Rain. I text my grandkids when we're coming to get their "huggers" ready and they laugh. My one grandson, who is a freshman at MIT, has called me every day of his Christmas break so far. I hope he never loses his innocent, hopeful outlook on life. And, yes, there is so much rage. Someone honked the horn at us the other day when we were out and Calvin said, "Don't look at them. We don't know how they're react. People are being killed for less." So sad.

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  2. Vonnie, I have to agree. I think we're in a world where etiquette, respect for others, honesty, and just plain old-fashioned kindness are now overshadowed by everyone needing to "grab their minute of fame"--whether they be the media, politicians, or everyday people needing attention. My husband and I also celebrated Christmas in a quiet way with the children away this year. It was peaceful, comfortable and oh, so wonderfully low-keyed.

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    1. Sometimes low-key is nice, isn't it, Judy Ann? I spent most of the afternoon in bed near the master bath. Calvin watched a basketball game next to me, keeping it on mute so I could snooze. The kids called and we never told them we were talking to them from bed. We got to giggling about that afterward.

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  3. So glad your loved ones are safe. Merry Christmas. I think there's always been hate and rage in the world. People are more willing to express that now for whatever reason, and we are more likely to hear about it--instantly.

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    1. I have a sad feeling you're right, Joan. There have always been wars and atrocities against others. Now we hear about it right away and over and over. I worry every time Ryan flies back and forth to MIT or my son flies to France or Sweden for Volvo. Airports seem a target as are planes. But we can't live our life in fear. Or the terrorists have won.

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  4. Vonnie, I enjoy your outlook on life. My family and I have discussed the rage that seems prevalent. I agree that there have always been hate and rage in the world. People like John Wesley Hardin would have shot a person for changing lanes in front of him. The problem is, there are so many more people like that these days, or so it seems to me. I agree with Judy that people have lost the proper manners and upbringing we took for granted.

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    1. So true, Caroline. We taught our children manners and to behave better out of our sight than they did when standing beside us. It was an expectation they had to live up to or they lost privileges. I'll never forget the time my youngest charged to his room in anger and slammed the door. I marched to his room and opened the door and said, "This is my house. I'm working to make the payments on it. If you slam this door again, I'll take it off the hinges." Well, he just had to try me. And he slept in a room with no door for two weeks. That was the last time he slammed a door in the house. If he closed one too hard, I heard "Sorry, Mom, that was an accident." Parents seem to think if they discipline their child, the kid will get angry and stop loving them. Not true. My son would do anything for me. He's 43 and still ends his phone calls or emails with "Love you, Mom."

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